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What if virtual reality wasn't just for fun, but was being used to imprison you? That's the dilemma that faces mild-mannered computer jockey Thomas Anderson (Keanu Reeves) in The Matrix. It's the year 1999, and Anderson (hacker alias: Neo) works in a cubicle, manning a computer and doing a little hacking on the side. It's through this latter activity that Thomas makes the acquaintance of Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne), who has some interesting news for Mr. Anderson -- none of what's going on around him is real. The year is ...

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piafinn

Jul 6, 2008

Redemptive Analogy

While I'm not a sci-fi fan, I appreciated watching the Matrix for the obvious Christian theme running throughout it: People are living in a world that they think is real, but it's just an illusion. There is a real world out there, and only those who've been there can say what it's like. There is a Redeemer coming, who will help them to cross over into it.
This chosen one is prophesied by an oracle (the Old Testament Scripture prophecies) and when he arrives, his enemies set out to get rid of him, because if they do, others won't learn about this world being a sham existence.
The One is eventually killed, but comes back to life. Where have I heard this story before?
One thing not consistent with the gospel story is that Neo didn't believe he was the One, whereas Christ always knew why he came to earth.
I'm sure those not familiar with the Gospel wouldn't see it, but to me it was obvious. I'm not sure whether it was intentional by the writers or not, I would think so. However, the other two movies in the series are largely disappointing and forgettable, as well as being pagan and sensual.

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