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Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa's The Seven Samurai (1954) is westernized as The Magnificent Seven. Yul Brynner plays Chris, a mercenary hired to protect a Mexican farming village from its annual invasion by bandit Calvera (Eli Wallach). As Elmer Bernstein's unforgettable theme music (later immortalized as the "Marlboro Man" leitmotif) blasts away in the background, Chris rounds up six fellow soldiers of fortune to help him form a united front against the bandits. The remaining "magnificent six" are played by Charles ...

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Gissinglover

May 6, 2020

Watching The Magnificent Seven During The Pandemic

I have been watching some of the classic Western movies during the pandemic, including this classic 1960 film, "The Magnificent Seven" directed by John Sturges and adopting an earlier 1954 film, "Seven Samurai" to a Western setting. With seven gunmen, the "Magnificent Seven", among its large cast, the film includes many famous and soon to be famous actors, including Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, Horst Bucholz among the gunmen and Eli Wallach as Calvera, the villain of the piece and the leader of a gang of outlaws. The star of the show, however, is Yul Brinner, who plays Chris, a tough gunslinger and the leader of the impromptu group of seven.

The movie is set and filmed and Mexico and tells about a large gang of bandits led by Calvera which bullies and intimidates a small village of farmers. Ultimately the farmers have enough and they hire Chris to help fight off the bandits. Chris hires six confreres, to help with this dangerous task. Each of the gunfighters has his own character and motivation, and they are all differentiated beautifully in the film. The gunfighters help prepare the villagers to assist them in fighting off the bandits. After many twists and turns and a lot of violence the village is left in peace with Chris observing at the end of the gunfighters, "we always lose".

As with many Westerns, "The Magnificent Seven" contrasts the life of settlement with the free-wheeling, independent life of gunfighters and loners. The gunfighters are shown as a dwindling group before they are gathered together by Chris to help the town. The town, settlement, and community win out with a fond look at the early wildness that helped make it possible.

The story is well-told, absorbing and easy to follow. The movie has a visceral appeal. Among the strongest features of the movie is the musical score by Elmer Bernstein. It is radiant and inspiring throughout, with its famous main theme, and almost defines the West in music.

In addition to its theme of settlement and community, the film speaks of the need to stand up for oneself and one's people in the face of bullying and violence.

This film is widely and deservedly recognized as among the best in the Western genre, and it has been listed by the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress as "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". I was glad to have the opportunity to see the film during these difficult times.

Robin Friedman

ducphil

Oct 18, 2012

True western McQueen

I learn to like horses when they learn to like martinis

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